New COVID-19 Cases Reported in Shanghai, 20 Major Hospitals Shut Down

A COVID-19 outbreak has reoccurred in Shanghai in recent days, with multiple confirmed local cases. From Nov. 25 to Nov. 26, more than 20 hospitals were shut down in city, and many local hospitals also suspending emergency services.

Three of the four newly confirmed local cases in China reported on Nov. 25 were in Shanghai, and one was reported in Dalian City of Liaoning Province.

The three patients in Shanghai had all visited Suzhou in the nearby Jiangsu Province. Both Hangzhou City in Zhejiang Province and Xuzhou City in Jiangsu Province have also reported new cases, all of who had dinner with the confirmed patients in Shanghai.

Shanghai has tightened its pandemic control measures. On Nov. 26, more than 30 percent of flights at Shanghai Pudong Airport and the nearby Xuzhou Guanyin Airport were cancelled.

In addition, the Shanghai City Bus and Shanghai Long-Distance Passenger Terminal also suspended many long-distance services to Jiangsu Province and Zhejiang Province, while inter-provincial travel businesses have been told to stop their services.

Mainland Chinese media reported that from Nov. 25 to Nov. 26, nine major hospitals in Shanghai announced they had received a notice from their managing governmental departments to assist in the investigation of the COVID-19 outbreak and to immediately suspend outpatient and emergency medical services. They are Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University, Minhang District Central Hospital, Tongji Hospital, Hongqiao District of Huashan Hospital, Putuo District People’s Hospital, and Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xinhua Hospital, and Shanghai Dermatology Hospital.

The sudden shutdown of Shanghai’s major hospitals after only three new cases were confirmed by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) officials has caused suspicion.

Netizens are asking why so many hospitals are closed. One posts read, “Where did the patient 1 in Shanghai go from Nov. 15 to Nov. 19? Why has it been covered up during this period?” Another post reads, “Nine hospitals are closed and patients who need emergency treatment have nowhere to go. The Shanghai medical system is nearly half paralyzed. There is no explanation.” Others ask, “Then why do so many hospitals need to be shut down? The questions that the people really care about have not been answered!”

By the evening of Nov. 26, the CCP’s official media, the “People’s Daily,” reported that more than 20 hospitals had been shut down in Shanghai.

Responding to growing questions and speculation from the community, Lu Taohong, deputy director of the Shanghai Municipal Health Commission, stated that the three confirmed cases were neither medical staff nor hospital-related business personnel. He said that one of them is a financial officer of a pharmaceutical company and has no direct business contact with the hospitals. He also said that the three COVID-19 patients were on a trip in Suzhou mainly to attend a lecture on ancient architecture. But among the dozen people who attended the dinner after the lecture, one was a doctor working in a hospital.

The statement from the authorities has not convinced netizens about the situation in Shanghai’s hospitals or how the outbreak started, with one person accusing the CCP of continuing to cover up what was happening with the outbreak. “Their story is getting more and more unbelievable,” they said.

Another netizen said of the situation in the CCP’s China, “You can’t believe what the so-called experts say at all. They never tell the truth.”

Alex Wu

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Alex Wu is a U.S.-based writer for The Epoch Times focusing on Chinese society, Chinese culture, human rights, and international relations.

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