New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

New Report Shows TPP Will Increase Incomes at the Cost of US Jobs





Susanne.Posel-Headline.News.Official- tpp.obama.jobs.congress.trans.pacific.partnership.warren_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | Co-Founder, Legacy Bio-Naturals

 

The Peterson Institute for International Economic (PIIE) released a report , used by the Obama administration, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that shows the pact will not increase employment, but rather increase corporate profits, exports and possibly contribute to economic growth within the US.

Manufacturing, the foundation of export-industry jobs, will not increase but stagnate under the TPP, which has been a point of contention for political opponents.

According to the authors of the PIIE report: “The TPP is a landmark accord [with] megaregional pact, binding Pacific-area nations that account for 36 percent of global trade and nearly a quarter of all exports, went further to phase out tariffs among the trading partners than expected, and included unprecedented trade rules governing labor and the environment, goods, services, global investment and digital commerce.”

For the US, incomes are expected to rise by $131 billion per year because of the TPP, which is equal to 0.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, exports would increase by 9.1% “above previous projections” within the next 15 years.

The PIIE report asserts that worker displacement would become a probability, but would remain “relatively small” because “movement of workers between jobs and industries” would increase; although by only 0.1%.

Peter Petri, professor of international finance at the Brandeis University International School of Business, recommends that efforts to assist workers displaced by the TPP intensify out of a “compelling ethical and political objective”.

Petri said: “Most workers who lose jobs do find alternative employment, but workers in specific locations, industries, or with skill shortages may experience serious transition costs including lasting wage cuts and unemployment. Since the costs to the individuals displaced can be quite high, compensating them for these costs, using a fraction of the total U.S. gains, is a compelling ethical and political objective, and policies to achieve equitable adjustment are likely to be affordable.”

While the TPP threatens 1/5th of manufacturing jobs, the “primary good industry” which represents agriculture and forestry, could see a surge in necessity. Export-intensive positions would also see a projected 18% increase over other jobs.

The biggest obstacle to the TPP is its lack of ratification, according to the report. This delay “by even one year would represent a $77 billion permanent loss, or opportunity cost, to the U.S. economy as well as create other risks.”

This sentiment is reflected in the 2015 detailed report produced by Senator Elizabeth Warren on multiple decades of failed trade enforcement by previous and the current sitting president in an effort to bring awareness to the dangers of the TPP.

Warren explained in a statement that the TPP is supported by people who have “said again and again that these deals would include strong protections for workers, but assurances without strong enforcement are just empty promises. The facts show that, despite all the promises, these trade deals were just another tool to tilt the playing field in favor of multinational corporations and against working families.”

The report points out: “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements.”

Warren explained that the president “has not effectively enforced existing labor standards in prior trade pacts” and the use of child labor, abuses for workers and “outright murder of union organizers” has gone unabated under Obama’s administration.

From former presidents such as Bill Clinton to Obama, the failure of US leaders to “effectively enforce promises to protect workers, even as rogue regimes have continued to benefit from other provisions of the agreements” is a fact that history can corroborate.

The report states: “We have two decades of experience with free trade agreements under both Democratic and Republican Presidents. Supporters of these agreements have always promised that they contain tough standards to protect workers. The rhetoric has not matched the reality.”

Even Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has criticized the president and stated that “Senator Warren is correct” on her assessment of the deal.

The TPP would bring the Investor-State Dispute Resolution (ISDS) “extrajudicial” court to “enormous power” to facilitate “secret corporate-backed deals”.

The ISDS operates by way of “highly paid corporate lawyers … go back and forth between representing corporations one day and sitting in judgment the next.”


Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OccupyCorporatism/~3/zmMKuOue2r0/

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply